Tag Archives: horror

Joe’s Random Movie Trivia: “The Rocky Horror Picture Show” (1975)

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The writer, musician and actor Richard O’Brien, who plays Riff Raff in the film, would later go on to play the villainous Mr. Hand in the 1997 scifi film “Dark City”.

 

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Joe’s Random Movie Trivia: “Wolf” (1994)

Five facts about the werewolf makeup used in the movie.

WARNING! CONTAINS SPOILERS!

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1. Rather than a film about somebody who changes into a werewolf during the full moon. The werewolf as it appears in this movie, is more less meant to represent man’s primitive side. The idea is it Will Randall (Jack Nicholson), changes every single night until the night of the first full moon. When the wolf spirit finally consumes his rational, human half. Because this character was going through such a gradual transformation throughout the film, the makeup used on him was extraordinarily simple. Simply being; yellow contact lenses, long sideburns along Nicholson’s face, pointed ears, fangs, and claws. Make up artist Rick Baker compared to the werewolf make up used in the 1935 film “Werewolf of London”. With the makeup gradually getting more and more extreme as the character continues to transform.

Jack Nicholson in Wolf (1994)

2. With his newfound wolf senses, the physical features of the character Randall would gradually at least appear to be getting a little bit younger after each transformation. For example one feature that is extremely noticeable throughout the film, is that the hair on his head is getting thicker. In the beginning of the film, Nicholson sports his traditional thin hair. Towards middle of the film the makeup department put powder in his hair to make it look like it was thicker. And then by the final third of the movie, Nicholson actually had to wear a toupee to further give the illusion that his character was getting some sort of youthful vitality back. Baker suggested that they actually use special wire to pull back Nicholson’s face to take some of the wrinkles out of it to give his face a kind of youthful appearance. To which Jack Nicholson smiled and replied “Absolutely not”.

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3. Jack Nicholson had a severe allergic reaction to the spirit gum traditionally used to stick fake hair on people. So Rick Baker had to use a special medical adhesive before applying Nicholson’s make up. But one day Baker had accidentally misplaced the medical adhesive and gave the actual spirit gum to Nicholson. The next day Nicholson came on said he had large red welts on his face.

4. For the scene where Randall hears everybody in his office building with his newfound wolf senses, Baker strapped a couple of electrodes to the back of Jack Nicholson’s ears. And then remotely made his ears twitch to give an almost canine look to his face as his ears moved to the sounds he was receiving.

5. James Spader’s werewolf make up took a little bit longer than Jack Nicholson’s. When Spader inquired Rick Baker about this, Baker explained that Spader’s face needed more work because his face wasn’t as “animated” as Jack Nicholson’s face was. And later explain that if he just gave him the hair, the fangs, the contact lens, and the pointed ears without doing the additions to his face, Spader would’ve come out looking like “Eddie Munster”.

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Joe’s Random Movie Trivia: “The Shining” (1980) Mr. Ullman’s Impossible Window

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Many fans of the film have noticed that the window seen at the beginning of the film, in Mr. Ullman’s office is an impossibility. Scenes that take place near the end of the film show that a hallway should be behind that office. Not the outside.

While this can be written-off as a continuity error, it further shows the mind bending space of the Overlook Hotel. The Hotel itself is a lot like a metaphorical maze the characters are going through. Leading up to the actual maze at the end of the movie.

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Joe’s Random Movie Review: “Hellboy” (2019)

David Harbour in Hellboy (2019)

While many fans of the comics in the films were disappointed when Guillermo Del Toro failed to deliver us a third film to his Hellboy franchise, a reboot was the next logical step. In 2019 that’s exactly what we got. This time, directly from Hellboy creator Mike Mignola and director Neil Marshall (Dog Soldiers, The Decent) have given us.

Milla Jovovich in Hellboy (2019)

In this age of remakes and reboot it’s easy to be cynical about such things. But in the case of the Hellboy franchise I think it is very well defended as a reboot. Because the franchise has such a rich mythology, specially in the comics, the Del Toro simply left it alone and wasn’t going to do anything with it. It’s exact same mistake that Warren Beatty made when he made Dick Tracy in 1990.

Daniel Dae Kim, David Harbour, and Sasha Lane in Hellboy (2019)

One thing that a lot of horror movie fans might enjoy from the new Hellboy movie as oppossed to the Del Toro films is that it actually ignores the whole superhero stereotype in some of today’s films. The previous films ahead actually focus more less on the superhero motif of Hellboy. Where is this new reboot actually focuses more on the horror and mythological elements.

David Harbour flat out as awesome as red. He gets the characterization perfect. It actually does in my opinion a much better job than Ron Perlman did. And Harbour’s performance we actually see Hellboy”s internal struggle to try and find a place in the world. In that way his version is a little bit more sympathetic, more grittier, and the kind of underdog that film fans want to root for.

This film is on also much closer to Mike Mignola’s universe. Including certain characters which make appearances besides Hellboy of course, and Professor Bruttenholm (now played by Ian McShane), it also has characters such as Alice Monaghan , Ben Daimio, even an appearance by Lobster Johnson.

Thomas Haden Church in Hellboy (2019)

This film was undoubtedly made for fans of a comic book, and such fans, myself included, were rewarded. It seems the only thing that’s really holding some back from total success, is the cynicism of people who regretted not getting a third original Hellboy film. Daniel Dae Kim in Hellboy (2019)

This film dares to be something different in this modern era of superhero films. It tried to ditch the superhero motif and present Hellboy as an all out gory horror film piece with quite a bit of humor and lots of action. Such a dark tone only helps the story.

David Harbour in Hellboy (2019)

Hopefully this film delivers us a sequel or two, because the universe set up in this one, has more action, more horror, more character development, and flat out is a good, fun movie.

6.5/10

“The Fly” (1986) The Deleted “Monkey-Cat” scene

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Shot, but later deleted from the film was a 6 to 7 minutes sequence in which the scientist Seth Brundle attempts to re-create the accident with his teleportation device that mutated him. He takes the surviving baboon from his earlier experiments in the film, and an alley cat that he found. Then tries to fuse the two together through his Telepods. But unlike his accident in which he in the fly were linked on a genetic level, the baboon and the cat become this hideously mutated two-headed creature. With the creature in obvious pain, Brundle picks up a pipe and proceeds to beat it to death. He then goes up to the roof of the building where he lives feels an excruciating pain in his side and attempt to climb down the wall but loses his grip. He didn’t slides down the wall and falls to the ground where a growth in his side appears. A mutated insect limb. Horrified, he tears it off.

Here are five facts about the scene:

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1. Why it was cut.

Besides the fact, that it delivered to much gore too early in the film, the real reason it was cut was because test audiences could no longer sympathize with the character of Seth Brundle. At some point in this film our Protagonist becomes the Antagonist. And the problem with the film including this scene, was that you no longer cared about the suffering the main character is going through. It was pretty evident to the filmmakers as a result of the test screenings, but the movie was better off without it.

2. “Stage 4b”

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This sequence features a stage in Brundle’s transformation not seen in the final film. Makeup Artist Chris Walas and his team dubbed it “stage 4b”. Walas said in interviews That was actually one of his favorite looks of Jeff Goldblum in the film. Because it had a Jekyll and Hyde quality about it. It was the halfway point between who Seth Brundle was in the beginning of the movie and into the creature Brundlefly that he later transforms into.

3. Director cameo

Besides his cameo as the gynecologist, director David Cronenberg is the one wielding the pipe that kills the creature in this shot.

4.

A large set of the warehouse wall was constructed for the shot where Brundle loses his grip and “slides” down the wall. To create this, the filmmakers made the wall slanted, like a slide so Goldblum could fall as well as give the illusion he’s sticking to it like a fly.

5. A shot from this deleted scene appears in the film’s original theatrical trailer.

Joe’s Random Movie Trivia: “Child’s Play” (1988)

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In Don Mancini’s original script, back when the film was called “Blood Buddies”, the Chucky doll wasn’t possessed at all.

The original idea was that the doll was a manifestation of the little boy’s Id. And with a workaholic mother, an abusive babysitter, and other children making fun of him, all the victims in the film were going to be people that the boy had a deep, subconscious rage towards.

Joe’s Random Movie Trivia: “American Psycho” (2000)

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In the scene when Detective Kimball (Willem Dafoe) questions Patrick Bateman, director Mary Harron shot a few versions of it. One where Kimball knew Bateman was guilty, one where he knew Bateman was innocent, and one where he wasn’t sure if Bateman was guilty or not.

Harron then edited the versions into one scene, making the audience just as confused as Bateman is, as he’s being questioned.